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A society of goals, anchoring, and the disillusioned psyche

February 9, 2016

A society of goals, anchoring, and the disillusioned psyche

by Lushfun

 

If we look at things that we are told by society at large we are constantly presented with plans that we must make, ambitions we must have, wants we need, and hoops we have to jump through. By placing before you a set piece of information that gets into your perception of relative achievement in one or more areas of life you anchor to the relative position you are in, in regard to that information. What happens is you are driven forth by giving you relative discomfort to the lack of achievement in regards to “others” that are out there doing better than you and are far happier because of it. All of this is implied but the psyche plays its’ own games with us.

“Tversky and Kahneman (1974) introduced the concept of anchoring and adjustment. Specifically, when individuals need to reach some judgment–perhaps the price they are willing to pay to purchase a particular car or the number of jelly beans in a jar–they form an initial judgment from some simple feature and then adjust this estimate, called an anchor, to form a final judgment. The adjustment, however, is usually conservative, and hence the final judgment is usually biased towards the anchor.”

We have some sort of a conscious understanding of where we fit and how well we do. However, once relative anchors are set by society at large and it itself is molded in various verticals of happiness determinants all of which have median adjustments to unrealistic expectations we all end up sort of well below those marks. In some sense it is a pre-determined failure because you are setting your happiness relative to the global median of various vertical happy outcomes in various verticals that are conformed to various medians of societal manipulated “desirable” outcomes. None of these aspects create a better conscious happiness in any of us, but it does create a sense of ‘lacking’ and broken people are easier to manipulate. Easier to direct someone to ‘fix themselves’ over and over until they are completely broken down from their own internal compass. At that point their own path to happiness is so thoroughly trampled on what they think they should build, see, do, achieve, it becomes very hard to return to realistic positioning of what that person really needs for happy living. Being happy is relative to your own internal clock of desirable outcomes, setting those to the relative desires of society is generally a false paradigm. Especially today. Good thoughts on consciousness of one’s’ standing already permeates our being. How this is used is another matter.

 

 

If one goes back to my prior post about hedonic treadmill and our average median expectations are pushed in various directions on the curve of what we think would make us happy, after we come to grips and ‘adjust’ from the surrealism or false perception given by our surroundings we never adjust enough to get out of the loop, of the supposition made before. The whole premise is created on a false dichotomy. It is never about the anchor but the one whom is making the anchor, you. What you see around you, what you feel when you are exposed to various societal instructions, plans, goals, and so on is the goal. What you actually want without these things is another matter, far more interesting if one tries to get at it.

Real rebels, rebel against themselves first, define your own happiness.

 

Be well, and happy, as well as you can be.

http://www.psych-it.com.au/Psychlopedia/article.asp?id=135

http://jspp.psychopen.eu/article/view/492/pdf

https://lushfun.wordpress.com/2016/01/20/philosophy-of-happiness-hedonic-treadmill-aside/

 

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